Your brain on Snapchat!

This is Your Brain on Snapchat!

As is frequently the case, the first ‘App’ I feature is not an App.  Rather, as we start the school year – and are in the final stages of planning for a special morning of Wellness related activities for our new Grade 9’s – I’ll take this opportunity to share some research on the relationship between social media and mood… and hence, one’s predisposition to learning.

Please follow this link to find this week’s recommended App: This is Your Brain on Snapchat! Produced in partnership by PBS Learning Media, I found this at my favourite EdTech website, FreeTech4Teachers.

Google Updates

We’re back!  I forgot entirely about posting the week after March Break, and since then I’ve been so busy I just completely forgot each of the following two Monday mornings. I had Poetry in Voice, and then Great Soup on my mind to the exclusion of all else on each of those successive Mondays.

I’m back at the cottage this weekend, in my happy place relaxing in the warmth and the sunshine, and realised – with quite a jolt yesterday – that I hadn’t posted here for a couple of weeks.  I have a remedy however!!  I have – why only now? – made myself a calendar alert reminder for Sunday’s.  My mind is not the steel trap it used to be.  Hopefully that’ll keep me on track.

But I digress…

Please follow this link to find this week’s recommended App: Google Product Updates.  I draw your attention to two locations on the web.

There is some overlap between these postings.  Straying from my usual format in these alerts, I’d like to comment on a couple of these items.  You can find my thoughts – for what they’re worth – in this shared Google Doc.

Photomath

 

Photomath

Photomath (for iOS and Android devices). For high-school students who just need a bit more guidance on how to isolate “x” in their algebra homework, Photomath is essentially your math buddy that can instantly solve and explain every answer. Simply snap a photo of the question (you can also write or type), and the app will break down the solution into separate steps with helpful play-by-play, so that you can apply the same principles to the rest of your homework. (Digital Trends)

The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Database and Blog

David Rumsey Map Collection

The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection and Blog.  Run out of Stanford, the database has many viewers and the Blog has numerous categories.  The historical map collection has over 67,000 maps and images online. The collection includes rare 16th through 21st century maps of AmericaNorth AmericaSouth AmericaEurope, Asia, Africa, Pacific and the World.